Some philosophers use a lot of words. The most word-shy means of expression is the haiku, a poem in which the number of syllables is severely restricted. (Opinions vary, about exactly what the restriction should be, to model the Japanese originals.) Here are some haiku, taking the form very broadly, capturing the thoughts of the least haiku-like philosophers. I donít claim much for them as poetry. But any contributions for philosophers I havenít covered? Brandom? Habermas?
 

Plato
flames leap
shadows dance.
stillness lies behind.

 
Aristotle
rabbits mate
stars circle
everything knows its target
 
Wittgenstein
wings beat at
invisible walls.
learn to love the bottle
Peacocke
to see is soon to think
but thinking this not that
is sometimes hard to say
McDowell
the world is full
of lovely things
only when you find them.
 
Hegel
the stream bends back
often, but always
goes where it is going
 
Putnam
round pegs are there
and really donít go into
square holes
 
Dummett
warm dinosaurs or cold?
hard to tell but
perhaps neither
 
Heidegger
stone
axe, no longer
rock, chipped by

nothing

 

Finally here are two that are not about particular philosophers. The first is inspired by the debate about the extensionality of belief, from Frege to Salmon and more recently Jennie Saul. The second is a kind of riddle: why does it fit its title?
Superman
one man does what
the same man cannot.
Lois flies tonight
 
Syllogism
human bones
Xantippe knew:
eventually the hemlock